Boxing Ontario’s Policy

Attached please find the newest version (Mar 2017) of the Boxing Ontario Policy and Procedure Manual.
(download the PDF)

Boxing Ontario’s Constitution

At the 2010 annual general meeting of Boxing Ontario the members adopted a new constitution
(download the PDF)

 

ANTI-DOPING POLICY

PREAMBLE

Boxing Ontario has adopted the Canadian Anti-Doping Program (CADP).

By adopting the CADP, Boxing Ontario has joined a world-class anti-doping program that is designed to protect athletes’ rights and ensure a level playing field. Boxing Ontario’s anti-doping policy reflects and supports the CADP.

POLICY

Boxing Ontario has adopted the Canadian Anti-Doping Program (CADP). As part of Boxing Ontario, all members are subject to Canada’s anti-doping rules, which are administered by the Canadian Centre for Ethics in Sport (CCES). The CADP consists of several components such as in- and out-of-competition testing, education, medical exemptions, and the consequences of doping violations, and is compliant with the World Anti-Doping Code and all international standards.

Canadian Anti-Doping Program

The CCES recommends that athletes take the following actions to ensure they don’t commit an inadvertent anti-doping rule violation:

1. Check the Global DRO (www.globaldro.com) to determine if any prescription or over-the counter medications or treatments that are banned by the WADA Prohibited List.
2. Review Medical Exemptions requirements click here if you require the use of a banned medication for a legitimate medical reason.
3. Do not use supplements, or take precautions prior to doing so. Supplement products cannot be verified by the CCES or in the Global DRO. A lack of industry and government regulation makes it impossible to confirm their ingredients. Read more: www.cces.ca/supplements

Review the steps of the doping control sample collection procedures as outlined in the Canadian Anti-Doping Program. For additional resources and more about anti-doping, please contact the CCES:
• Email: info@cces.ca
• Call toll-free: 1-800-672-7775
• Online: www.cces.ca/athletezone

CONCUSSION POLICY

Purpose

The purpose of this Policy is to contribute to a safe sporting environment through education and by promoting awareness of concussion diagnosis and graduated return to play of members who have suffered a concussion.

Definition Cited from Ministry Tourism, Culture and Sport Concussion Guideline

A concussion:

• Is a brain injury that causes changes in how the brain functions, leading to symptoms that can be physical (e.g., headache, dizziness), cognitive (e.g., difficulty concentrating or remembering), emotional/behavioural (e.g., depression, irritability) and/or related sleep (e.g., drowsiness, difficulty falling asleep);

• May be caused either by a direct blow to the head, face or neck, or a blow to the body that transmits a force to the head that causes the brain to move rapidly within the skull;

• Can occur even if there has been no loss of consciousness (In fact most concussions occur without a loss of consciousness); and,

• Cannot normally be seen on X-rays, standard CT scans or MRIs.

Concussion Awareness and Education

Boxing Ontario is committed to the concussion education of our athletes, coaches and officials. Concussion resources will be accessible to all athletes, coaches, officials, parents and stakeholders. The resources will include information on concussion identification, management and treatment. Links on Boxing Ontario’s website available to help educate the membership include:

• Parachute Canada’s Concussion Guidelines for Coaches and Trainers
• Making Head Way Concussion eLearning Series
• What’s Your Concussion IQ?
• Ministry of Tourism, Culture and Sport Concussion Guidelines.
• Concussions: 10 Things You didn’t Know

Medical Assessment

Boxing Ontario asserts that it is critical any athlete, coach, or official, that has concussion signs and symptoms stop all activity immediately and be assessed by a medical doctor.

Graduated Return to Play

Boxing Ontario recommends that our graduated return to play protocol is followed. There should be no return to play until the athlete has been medically cleared and has successfully returned to training, if applicable, without worsening of symptoms.

Boxing Ontario’s Return to Play Guidelines and Form are found on our website. The steps stated in these forms are as follows:

STEP 1: No activity, only complete rest.
Limit school, work and tasks requiring concentration. Refrain from physical activity until symptoms are gone. Once symptoms are gone, a physician, preferably one with experience managing concussions, should be consulted before beginning a step wise return to play process.

STEP 2: Light aerobic exercise.
Activities such as walking or stationary cycling. The competitor should be supervised by someone who can help monitor for symptoms and signs. No resistance training or weight lifting. The duration and intensity of the aerobic exercise can be gradually increased over time if no symptoms or signs return during the exercise or the next day.

Symptoms? Return to rest until symptoms have resolved. If symptoms persist, consult a physician.
No symptoms? Proceed to Step 3 the next day.

STEP 3: Sport specific activities.
Activities such as light shadow boxing (throwing punches without any contact/ avoiding any jarring motions), light footwork activities, can begin at step 3. There should be “no body contact” or other jarring motions such as high speed stops or heavy bag striking with force at this stage.
Symptoms? Return to rest until symptoms have resolved. If symptoms persist, consult a physician.
No symptoms? Proceed to Step 4 the next day.
STEP 4: Begin Drills without body contact.
Symptoms? Return to rest until symptoms have resolved. If symptoms persist, consult a physician.
No symptoms? The time needed to progress from non-contact exercise will vary with the severity of the concussion and with the player.
Proceed to Step 5 only after medical clearance.

STEP 5: Begin Drills with body contact.
Symptoms? Return to rest until symptoms have resolved. If symptoms persist, consult a physician.
No symptoms? Proceed to Step 6 the next day.
STEP 6: game play.

Boxing Ontario Concussion Policy: Administration

• Policy effective and renewal date:
o Policy is reviewed every 4 years to coincide with International Consensus on Sport in Concussion
• Purpose of the policy: A clear policy purpose that can be measured in the evaluation section (7.0) For example: The purpose of the policy is to increase education and awareness for coaches, parents/guardians and participants on the signs and symptoms of concussion identification and the specific protocols for managing concussion in BOXING ONTARIO sanctioned activities.
• Jurisdiction of the policy: The policy covers the following people – All members of Boxing Ontario in the following – All training and competitive activities. (Note, this policy can only cover the members affiliated with this entity, i.e. provincial team members)
• Requirement for member or affiliate status clubs and organizations to implement similar policy that can strengthen, but cannot weaken the policy of the PSO.
• Non-compliance – a statement or direction for what will happen in the event of non compliance

Policy on Concussion is expected to contain, at a minimum, the following components:

1.0 Awareness and Training

Awareness

• Definition of concussion (including second impact, information on the distinction between concussion and other injuries)
• possible mechanisms of injury
• common signs and symptoms
• steps that can be taken to prevent concussions and other injuries from occurring in sport
• what to do when a participant has suffered a suspected concussion or more serious head injury
• what measure should be taken to ensure proper medical assessment including Return-to-School and Return-to-Sport Strategies
• definition of medical assessment
• Return-to-sport medical clearance requirements

Training

The policy will include direction on training which can include the policy itselfas well as relevant concussion recognition and management tools such as CRT5 and the sport-specific return to play guidelines.

• Ensure all relevant stakeholders are communicated about any policy revisions.
• Identify who, or what roles specifically, require training.
• Specify what the training looks like (a recommended tool, workshop, etc.)?
• Specify how often is training required?
• Ensure all relevant stakeholders are trained on policy revisions.

2.0 Prevention/Ensure Safe Play

The policy should make reference to other policies, rules, regulations or by-laws that relate to safety. Specifically, there should be mention of:

• The code of conduct
• Rules and regulations that address safe play such as limiting head and body contact
• Checking equipment to ensure correct fit, good condition, replaced according to manufacturer’s instructions
• Checking facilities to ensure a safe environment for participation
• Rules and regulations that address stopping activities for injury

3.0 Detection: Recognize, Remove, Refer

Recognize

Although the formal diagnosis of concussion should be made following a medical assessment, all sport stakeholders including participants, parents, coaches, officials, trainers and licensed healthcare professionals are responsible for the recognition and reporting of participants who demonstrate visual signs of a head injury or who report concussion symptoms. In the context of the PSO, the role of the Most Responsible Person (MRP)as defined below, is to ensure adherence to the recognize, remove, refer and return protocol.

A concussion should be suspected in any participant who sustains a significant impact to the head, face, neck, or body and demonstrates ANY of the visual signs of a suspected concussion or reports ANY symptoms of a suspected concussion (see Figure 1, 2 and 3).Any participant with a suspected concussion should be removed from activity immediately for medical assessment by a medical doctor or nurse practitioner.

In some cases, a participant may demonstrate signs or symptoms of a more severe head or spin injury including convulsions, worsening headaches, vomiting or neck pain. If a participant demonstrates any of the ‘Red Flags’ indicated in Figure 1, a more severe head or spine injury should be suspected, and Emergency Medical Assessment should be pursued.

Most Responsible Person (MRP)
This person is:
• Must be identified before any sanctioned activity
• To be trained on the signs and symptoms of concussion and relevant tools
• To call 911 when any Red Flag Symptom(s) are present
• To require participants to obtain a Medical Assessment Letter from a medical doctor or nurse practitioner *when Red Flag Symptom(s) are not present but other concussion sign(s) and/ or symptom(s) are present
• To refer the participant back to the activity if no concussion sign(s) and/or symptom(s) are reported or observed
• To remain with the participant until discharged to a parent/guardian/trusted adult or EMS. (For participants over 18 years of age, their emergency contact person should be contacted)
• To document assessment and/or injury details as required by organization

*Medical doctors and nurse practitioners are the only healthcare professionals in Canada with licensed training and expertise to meet these needs; there all athletes with a suspected concussion should undergo evaluation by one of these professionals. In rural or northern regions, the Medical Clearance Letter may be completed by a nurse with pre-arranged access to a medical doctor or nurse practitioner.Forms completed by other licensed healthcare professionals should not otherwise be accepted.

Remove

If an athlete is suspected of sustaining a concussion and there is no concern for a more serious head or spin injury, the athlete should be immediately removed from the field of play.

Refer

Scenario1: If a licensed healthcare professional is present
The athlete should be taken to a quiet area and undergo Sideline Medical Assessment using the Sport Concussion Assessment Tool 5 (SCAT5) or the Child SCAT5. The SCAT5 and Child SCAT5 are clinical tools that should only be used by a licensed medical professional that has experience using these tools. It is important to note that the results of SCAT5 and Child SCAT5 testing can be normal in the setting of acute concussion. As such, these tools can be used by licensed healthcare professionals to document initial neurological status but should not be used to make sideline return-to-sport decisions in youth athletes. Any youth athlete who is suspected of having sustained a concussion must not return to the game or practice and should be referred for Medical Assessment.

If a youth athlete is removed from play following a significant impact and has undergone Sideline Medical Assessment, but there are NO visual signs of a concussion and the athlete reports NO concussion symptoms then the athlete can be return to play but should be monitored for delayed symptoms.

In the case of national team-affiliated athletes (age 18 years and older) who have been removed from play following a suspected concussion, an experienced certified athletic therapist, physiotherapist or medical doctor providing medical coverage for the sporting event may make the determination that a concussion has not occurred based on the results of the Sideline Medical Assessment. In these cases, the athlete may be return to the practice or game without a Medical Clearance Letter but this should be clearly communicated to the coaching staff. Players that have been cleared to return to games or practices should be monitored for delayed symptoms by the licensed healthcare professional. If the athlete develops any delayed symptoms the athlete should be removed from play and undergo Medical Assessment by a medical doctor or nurse practitioner*.

Scenario 2: If there is no licensed healthcare professional present
The athlete should be referred immediately for Medical Assessment by a medical doctor or nurse practitioner*, and the athlete must not return to play until receiving medical clearance.

Notes:
• PSO to input injury report form they have if they have an injury tracking implementation plan.
• Each PSO is responsible for assigning the most responsible person (MRP) for removing participant with a suspected concussion. This individual will have the final say in removal from play of participants with suspected concussions across the PSO.Second person may be helpful to identify who is responsible if MRP is not always present (i.e. at practice).
• Try to limit assessment tools that put clinical decisions on volunteer and non-clinically trained staff. Put emphasis on “refer to medical doctors and nurse practitioners” piece.

1) Referring a participant with a suspected concussion:
a. Red Flags: If any Red Flag Symptom(s) are present (Figure 1), the MRP or designate is to call 911 immediately.
b. Concussion Sign(s) and/or Symptom(s): If any concussion sign(s) and or symptom(s) are present (Figure 2and Figure 3) the MRP or designatewill communicateto the participant’s parent/guardian the need for immediate medical assessment by a medical doctor or a nurse practitioner*. It is the parent/guardian’s responsibility to ensure the participant with the suspected concussion receives immediatereferral to a medical doctor or nurse practitioner*for medical assessment.
Figure 1: RED FLAGS SYMPTOMS (Call 911 immediately to go to nearest emergency department)
Neck Pain or tenderness Deteriorating conscious state
Double vision Vomiting
Weakness or tingling/burning in arms or legs Increasingly restless, agitated or combative
Severe or increasing headache Loss of consciousness
Seizure or convulsion

Figure 2: OBSERVABLE SIGNS – Visual clues that suggest possible concussion(immediate referral to medical doctor or nurse practitioner*)2
Lying motionless on the playing surface Disorientation or confusion, or an inability to respond appropriately to questions Balance, gait difficulties, motor incoordination, stumbling, slow laboured movements
Slow to get up after a direct or indirect hit to the head Blank or vacant look Facial injury after hear trauma

Figure 3: GENERAL CONCUSSIONSYMPTOMS (immediate referral to medical doctor or nurse practitioner*)3
Headache Blurred vision Neck Pain
“Pressure in head” Sensitivity to light Difficulty concentrating
Balance problems Sensitivity to noise Difficulty remembering
Nausea or vomiting Fatigue or low energy Feeling slowed down
Drowsiness “Don’t feel right” Feeling like “in a fog”
Dizziness More emotional
Nervous/anxious

Note: Medical Assessment Letterdocumentationmust be to be communicatedto the MRP. It is up to PSO to indicate if Medical Assessment Letter needs to be sent beyond the scope of parent/guardian and MRP, and to a governing body and league for tracking purposes. It can take 24-48hours for concussion symptoms to appear.

4.0 Management procedures

It is the responsibility of the parent/guardian to provideMedical Assessment Letter completed by a medical doctor or nurse practitioner*regarding diagnosis (concussion or no concussion) to the MRP.

For a no-concussion diagnosis by a medical doctor or nurse practitioner*:
Where the Medical Assessment Letter indicatesno concussion has occurred the participant can return to activity.

For a concussion diagnosis by a medical doctor or nurse practitioner*:
Where the Medical Assessment Letterindicates a concussion has occurred the participant will be managed by the MRP and in accordance with the graduated return to sport (RTS) guidelines (see Figure 3).

Figure 3: GRADUATED RETURN-TO- SPORT STRATEGYi

Stage Aim Activity Goal of each step
1. Symptom-linked activity Daily activities that do not provoke symptoms Gradual reintroduction of work/school activities
2. Light aerobic exercise Walking or stationary cycling at slow to medium pace. No resistance training. Increased heart rate
3. Sport-specific exercise Running or skating drills. No head impact activities. Add movement.
4. Non-contact training drills Harder training drills (e.g. passing drills). May start progressive resistance training. Exercise, coordination, and increased thinking.
5. Full contact practice Following medical clearance from a medical doctor or nurse practitioner* to participate in normal training activities. Restore confidence and assess functional skills by coaching staff
6. Return to sport Normal game play

iMcCrory, Paul, et al. “Consensus statement on concussion in sport—the 5th international conference on concussion in sport held in Berlin, October 2016.” Br J Sports Med (2017): bjsports-2017

NOTE: An initial period of 24–48 hours of both relative physical rest and cognitive rest is recommended before beginning the RTS progression. There should be at least 24 hours (orlonger) for each step of the progression. If any symptoms worsen during exercise, the participantshould go back to the previous step. Resistance training should be added only in the later stages (stage 3 or 4 at the earliest). If symptoms are persistent (e.g., more than 10–14 days in adults or more than 1 month in children), the participant may benefit from referral to a medically-supervised multidisciplinary concussion clinic that has access to professionals with licensed training in traumatic brain injury that may include experts in sport medicine, neuropsychology, physiotherapy, occupational therapy, neurology, neurosurgery, and rehabilitation medicine.

For a participant to progress to Step 4 Medical Clearance Letter is required from a medical doctor or nurse practitioner *indicating that the participant is able to return to Step 5, full contact practice. Parent/guardian is responsible for providing this information to the MRP.

Return-to-School
Children and adolescents should not return to full sport participation until theyhave successfully returned to school, however early introduction of symptom-limited physical activity is appropriate.

ADDITIONAL NOTE: PSO’S are encouraged to replace under the Activity section their sport specific activities in Steps 2,3,4,5.

5.0 Surveillance – Tracking Incidence

Ensure use of a system for collecting and analyzing concussion injury incident data reported during the season or program for purposes of organizational injury prevention. Organization can usean existing mechanism or adapt/adopt a reporting mechanism refer to appendix – urces for PSO’s.

6.0 Evaluation

o Review of the implementation of the policy based on its efficacy recommended annually
o How will policy be evaluated? By whom?
o Refer back to the policy purpose

Appendix – Key Term Definitions

Licensed healthcare professional: A healthcare provider who is licensed by a national professional regulatory body to provide concussion-related healthcare services that fall within their licensed scope of practice. Examples include medical doctors, nurses, physiotherapists, and athletic therapists.

Among licensed healthcare professionals, only medical doctors and nurse practitioners are qualified to conduct a comprehensive medical assessment and provide a concussion diagnosis in Canada. The types of medical doctors qualified to do such an evaluation are: pediatricians; family medicine, sports medicine, emergency department and rehabilitation (physiatrists) physicians; neurologists; and neurosurgeons.

Medical Assessment: The evaluation of an individual by a licensed healthcare professional to determine the presence or absence of a medical condition or disorder, such as a concussion.

Treatment: An intervention provided by a licensed healthcare professional to address a diagnosed medical condition/disorder or its associated symptoms, such as physical therapy.

Multidisciplinary concussion clinic: A facility or network of licensed healthcare professionals that provide assessment and treatment of concussion patients and are supervised by a physician with training and experience in concussion.

Tool: A standardized instrument or device that can be used to help recognize an event (i.e. a suspected concussion) or assess an individual with a suspected medical diagnosis (i.e. Sport Concussion Assessment Tool 5).

Document: A standardized written letter or form that can help facilitate communication between sport stakeholders.

Concussion Recognition Tool – 5th Edition (CRT5): A tool intended to be used for the identification of suspected concussion in children, youth, and adults. Published in 2017 by the Concussion in Sport Group, the CRT5 replaces the previous Pocket Concussion Recognition Tool from 2013.

Sport Concussion Assessment Tool – 5th Edition (SCAT5): A standardized tool for evaluating concussions in individuals aged 13 years or older, designed for use by physicians and licensed healthcare professionals. Published in 2017 by the Concussion in Sport Group, the SCAT5 replaces the previous SCAT3 from 2013.

Child Sport Concussion Assessment Tool – 5th Edition (Child SCAT5): A standardized tool for evaluating concussions in individuals aged 5 to 12 years, designed for use by physicians and licensed healthcare professionals. Published in 2017 by the Concussion in Sport Group, the Child SCAT5 replaces the previous Child SCAT3 from 2013.

Return-to-School Strategy: A graduated stepwise strategy for the process of recovery and return to academic activities after a concussion. The broader process of returning to cognitive activities has commonly been referred to as “return to learn”.

Return-to-Sport Strategy: A graduated stepwise strategy for the process of recovery and then return to sport participation after a concussion. The broader process of returning to unstructured and structured physical activity has commonly been referred to as “return to play

1McCrory et al. (2017). Consensus statement on concussion in sport – the 5th international conference on 1 concussion in sport held in Berlin, October 2016.

Appendix – Definitions for Policy Development

WHAT IS A CONCUSSION?
A concussion is a brain injury that can’t be seen on x-rays, CT or MRI scans. It affects the way an athlete thinks and can cause a variety of symptoms.

WHAT CAUSES A CONCUSSION?
Any blow to the head, face or neck, or somewhere else on the body that causes a sudden jarring of the head may cause a concussion. Examples include getting body-checked in hockey or hitting one’s head on the floor in gym class.

WHEN SHOULD I SUSPECT A CONCUSSION?
A concussion should be suspected in any athlete who sustains a significant impact to the head, face, neck, or body and reports ANY symptoms or demonstrates ANY visual signs of a concussion. A concussion should also be suspected if an athlete reports ANY concussion symptoms to one of their peers, parents, teachers, or coaches or if anyone witnesses an athlete exhibiting ANY of the visual signs of concussion. Some athletes will develop symptoms immediately while others will develop delayed symptoms (beginning 24-48 hours after the injury).

WHAT ARE THE SYMPTOMS OF A CONCUSSION?
A person does not need to be knocked out (lose consciousness) to have had a concussion. Common symptoms include:

‣ Headaches or head pressure
‣ Dizziness
‣ Nausea and vomiting
‣ Blurred or fuzzy vision
‣ Sensitivity to light or sound
‣ Balance problems
‣ Feeling tired or having no energy
‣Not thinking clearly
‣ Feeling slowed down
‣Easily upset or angered
‣ Sadness
‣ Nervousness or anxiety
‣ Feeling more emotional
‣Sleeping more or sleeping less
‣Having a hard time falling asleep
‣ Difficulty working on a computer
‣ Difficulty reading
‣ Difficulty learning new information

WHAT ARE THE VISUAL SIGNS OF A CONCUSSION? Visual signs of a concussion may include:
• Lying motionless on the playing surface
• Slow to get up after a direct or indirect hit to the head
• Disorientation or confusion or inability to respond appropriately to questions
• Blank or vacant stare
• Balance, gait difficulties, motor incoordination, stumbling, slow labored movements
• Facial injury after head trauma
• Clutching head

WHAT SHOULD I DO IF I SUSPECT A CONCUSSION?
If any athlete is suspected of sustaining a concussion during sports they should be immediately removed from play. Any athlete who is suspected of having sustained a concussion during sports must not be allowed to return to the same game or practice. It is important that ALL athletes with a suspected concussion undergo medical assessment by a medical doctor or nurse practitioner*, as soon as possible. It is also important that ALL athletes with a suspected concussion receive written Medical Clearance from a medical doctor or nurse practitioner* before returning to sport activities.

WHEN CAN THE ATHLETE RETURN TO SCHOOL AND SPORTS?
It is important that all athletes diagnosed with a concussion follow a step-wise return to school and sports-related activities that includes the following Return-to-School and Return-to-Sport Strategies. It is important that youth and adult studentathletes return to full-time school activities before progressing to stage 5 and 6 of the Return-to-Sport Strategy.

SECOND IMPACT SYNDROME
Research suggests that a child or youth who suffers a second concussion before he or she is symptom free from the first concussion is susceptible to a prolonged period of recovery, and possibly Second Impact Syndrome – a rare condition that causes rapid and severe brain swelling and often catastrophic results.

SERIOUSNESS OF CONCUSSION
Recent research has made it clear that a concussion can have a significant impact on a student’s cognitive and physical abilities. In fact, research shows that activities that require concentration can actually cause a student’s concussion symptoms to reappear or worsen. It is equally important to develop strategies to assist students as they “return to learn” in the classroom as it is to develop strategies to assist them “return to physical activity”.Withoutaddressing identification and proper management, a concussion can result in permanent brain damage and in rare occasions, even death.

MEDICAL ASSESSMENT
In order to provide comprehensive evaluation of athletes with a suspected concussion, the medical assessment must rule out more serious forms of traumatic brain and spine injuries, must rule out medical and neurological conditions that can present with concussion-like symptoms, and must make the diagnosis of concussion based on findings of the clinical history and physical examination and the evidence-based use of adjunctive tests as indicated (i.e. CT scan). In addition to nurse practitioners, the types of medical doctors that are qualified to evaluate patients with a suspected concussion include: pediatricians; family medicine, sports 2 medicine, emergency department, internal medicine and rehabilitation (physiatrists) physicians; neurologists; and neurosurgeons.

In geographic regions of Canada with limited access to medical doctors (i.e. rural or northern communities), a licensed healthcare professional (i.e. nurse) with pre-arranged access to a medical doctor or nurse practitioner can facilitate this role. The medical assessment is responsible for determining whether the athlete has been diagnosed with a concussion or not. Athletes with a diagnosed concussion should be provided with a Medical Assessment Letter indicating a concussion has been diagnosed. Athletes that are determined to have not sustained a concussion must be provided with a Medical Assessment Letter indicating a concussion has not been diagnosed and the athlete can return to school, work and sport activities without restriction.

Appendix – Resources

Canadian Guideline on Concussion in Sport

AWARNESS: Free education tools for members and participants
Course: Concussion Awareness Training Tool for Players, Parents, Coaches
Course: Making Head Way eLearning Series for coaches
Video: Concussions 101, a Primer for Kids and Parents – Dr. Mike Evans
Video: Concussion management and return to learn – Dr. Mike Evans

TRAINING:
Course: Concussion Awareness Training Tool for Players, Parents, Coaches
Course: Making Head Way eLearning Series for coaches

PREVENTION:
OPESGCP Appendix C-5– Sample Concussion Prevention Strategies

RETURN TO LEARN:

Consensus statement on concussion in sport – the 5th international conference on concussion in sport held in Berlin, October 2016

DETECTION:
Concussion Recognition Tool 5(CRT5)
Child Sport Concussion Assessment Tool – 5th Edition (Child SCAT5)
Sport Concussion Assessment Tool – 5th Edition (SCAT5)

MANAGEMENT AND POST-CONCUSSION CARE:
A guide to post-concussion care in Ontario: right care, right time, right provider
Concussion Handbook for parents and youth – Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital
Concussion & You online support sessions – Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital

SURVEILLANCE:
Playsafe app, free Injury Tracker

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